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NICE to host NHS Evidence

NICE will manage the synthesis and spread of knowledge on good clinical and non-clinical practice through NHS Evidence, a new service for ensuring health service staff have access to quality assured information.

This single portal will support the commissioning and uptake of the most clinically and cost effective diagnostics, treatments and procedures. It was announced in June in the NHS next stage review final report, ‘High Quality Care for All'.

NHS Evidence will build and expand on services currently provided by the National Library for Health for all NHS users.

Drawing on local, national and international sources, it will provide relevant information on: primary research, summarised clinical evidence, policy documents, commissioning (including commissioning for care pathways) and drugs (including new drugs and prescribing advice).

A key component of the service will be a new quality assessment process to ensure the best information is clearly ‘kite-marked'. The new ‘kite mark' will become a recognisable indicator of independently verified, high-quality evidence.

NHS Evidence will be designed for professionals, but will be openly available to patients and the public alike. The aim is to make it as easy to use as any popular internet search engine.

All those involved in clinical or public health decisions will have the option of receiving alerts about significant new evidence in specific areas of interest, which they can access for free.

Minister and surgeon Lord Ara Darzi, who wrote the NHS report, described NHS Evidence as a new service that will provide easy access for NHS staff to information about high quality care. NHS Evidence, the report said: ‘will ensure that all NHS staff will be able to get, through a single web-based portal, authoritative clinical and non-clinical evidence and best practice, with detail about what high quality care looks like and how to deliver it'.

Currently, evidence of what works to prevent and treat many conditions and diseases is generated, interpreted and presented by a large number of NHS and non-NHS organisations.

These disparate sources can make it difficult for decision-makers - both within and outside the NHS - to gain access to the information they need. There are also no guarantees that the information they do access is based on the best evidence available. As a result, it can mean that best practice - in terms of both prevention and cure - is not applied consistently by the NHS or its partners.

Phase one of NHS Evidence will be launched in April 2009. The full service will take a further 1 to 2 years to develop.

This page was last updated: 12 July 2010

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Selected, reliable information for health and social care in one place

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.