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NICE unveils latest Fellows and Scholars

8040966-article-ctscanExploring whether patients should give consent for CT scans, increasing the green credentials of the NHS, and examining the uptake of NICE guidance are just some of the projects planned by the latest group of fellows and scholars.

The latest appointments have been made across a wide range of health disciplines, including academia, psychiatry, general practice, management, obstetrics, midwifery, radiology and public health.

Three senior social care professionals have also been awarded NICE fellowships, following the government's plans for NICE to develop social care quality standards from 2012.

Newly appointed scholar Dr Patrick Rogers, a Specialist Registrar in Clinical Radiology at Plymouth NHS Trust, aims to look at patient's perception of the risk from radiation in medical imaging.

Diagnostic imaging is being used more and more within healthcare, and yet it is not without risks. The dose from a CT scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis is about 10 millisieverts (mSv) for UK adults giving an average risk of dying from cancer of 1 in 2,000.

Dr Rogers intends to find out how the public could become involved in managing these risks, and whether patients would find it acceptable to be asked to give consent for CT examinations.

Dr James Smith, Public Health Registrar at the NHS Sustainable Development Unit and another of the new scholars, will carry out a project around introducing sustainability into guidance development and the health system as a whole.

NICE fellow Paul Blenkiron, a Consultant Psychiatrist for NHS North Yorkshire and York, will evaluate the impact of NICE guidelines upon front line mental health services, focusing in particular on adherence to NICE's 2009 depression guideline.

Other topics that will be explored include promoting NICE guidance and quality standards amongst the new GP commissioners, developing a communication network for those involved in the delivery of wound care, and a validation study of a virtual reality simulator for training a nephrostomy procedure.

Professor Peter Littlejohns, Director of Clinical and Public Health at NICE said: “Our Fellows and Scholars Programme is a unique opportunity for motivated and dynamic individuals across the country to exchange ideas and get support from NICE in driving up the quality of care in their local and professional communities.”

The Fellows and Scholars Programme was established in 2009 to create a network of like-minded health professionals linked to NICE who are committed to improving the quality of care in their local areas.

The thirteen fellowships have been awarded to senior professionals who will act as ambassadors for care and public health excellence and as conduits of information between NICE and frontline staff.

The ten scholarships have been awarded to specialist registrars or other equivalently qualified health professionals. While the appointees will similarly be expected to act as local ambassadors for NICE, their activities during their twelve months in post will be more project-based. Their projects will meet an identified local need and will be agreed by their training supervisors or employers.

1 April 2011

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Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.