Navigation

Shared Learning Awards winner announced

Newspage: doctorsManchester Royal Infirmary has scooped this year's Shared Learning Award for their work in transforming haemodialysis treatment in Manchester.

The home haemodialysis team developed an innovative approach to dialysis delivery which has empowered patients to perform haemodialysis independently at home, avoiding the need for regular visits to the hospital for treatment.

The programme, which is currently the largest of its kind in Europe and open to all patients in the Manchester area undergoing treatment for kidney failure, was set up because of concerns with the patient outcomes of hospital haemodialysis.

Mortality rates for many patients on conventional haemodialysis are worse than most cancers in adults. Many patients lose their jobs because of the frequent trips to the hospital for dialysis, often 3 days per week, and suffer from constant tiredness.

The Manchester team now provides its patients with the tools and know how required to make the transition to home haemodialysis, which allows more flexibility, with longer or more frequent sessions , enabling patients to fit dialysis around their lives.

Many patients opt to undergo the treatment whilst asleep between three to five nights a week, which is less restrictive, safer and more convenient.

Since the introduction of home haemodialysis, patient experience has improved and it has resulted in superior clinical outcomes.

Patient feedback from following the transition to home haemodialysis has been extremely positive. One patient said: "When I was faced with hospital dialysis, I lost a lot of self esteem, felt low and lost interest in a lot of things - it was like a downward spiral. Home dialysis has suddenly made me feel more interested, happier and relaxed."

As well as being a benefit to patients, it has also generated financial savings, with costs up to 40 per cent lower than hospital care. More than 175 patients so far have been trained in this programme to be independent on home haemodialysis, with increasing numbers joining every day.

Dr Sandip Mitra, Consultant Renal Physician at the Manchester Royal Infirmary said: "The programme has been driven by patient choice and motivation, with results confirming that home haemodialysis is a viable treatment option that should be made available to all those who might benefit.

"We hope that the project will inspire more programmes across the country to offer this choice of treatment to suitable patients on dialysis."

Announcing the winner at the NICE annual conference in Birmingham, Professor Sir Michael Rawlins, praised the high quality of all of this year's Shared Learning Award entries.

"We have seen some fantastic things locally across the NHS which all deserve a prize. It's an example of the extraordinary things that people do in the NHS," he said.

11 May 2011

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Selected, reliable information for health and social care in one place

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.