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NICE education modules "a real hit" with users

Newspage: NHS colleagues at deskOver 95,000 healthcare professionals have used NICE's online learning modules to improve their knowledge of key clinical areas since their launch in 2005.

Currently, there are 27 online modules on a whole host of topics ranging from anxiety disorders to tuberculosis. The modules, developed in collaboration with BMJ Learning, form part of NICE's education programme set up to meet the learning needs of healthcare professionals and designed to empower them to overcome any potential barriers in their day to day work.

Up to December 2009, our figures reveal that a total of 95,816 clinicians have completed NICE e-learning modules.

Feedback collected on 4 of the e-learning modules launched in 2008/9 has found that over 5,000 users completed the modules within the first three months of launching.

These modules covered recommendations relevant to NICE guidance on irritable bowel syndrome in adults, prophylaxis against infective endocarditis in adults and children undergoing interventional procedures, osteoarthritis in adults and urinary tract infection in children.

The response from users was overwhelmingly positive with many clinicians stating that the modules had helped or would help them implement respective NICE guidelines.

"The NICE/BMJ learning modules are a real hit, they have brought the clinical guidelines to life and provide real world examples to aid adult learning," according to Dr Donal O'Donoghue, the Department of Health's clinical director for kidney services.

"The chronic kidney disease (CKD) module, based on the NICE guideline for the early identification and management of CKD, has proved to be extremely popular.

"Introducing CKD into the quality and outcome framework (QOF) gave kidney disease visibility. Now the knowledge and know how that NICE/BMJ learning is providing is helping to build upon that visibility and is leading to health gains for the 10% of the population with CKD."

The NICE education programme also provides final year medical students with four e-learning modules designed to fill in any gaps in medical education between the theory of evidence based medicine and how to put this into practice.

The modules are accessible for medical students through e-Learning for Health and were developed after a survey by the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine found that the education on evidence-based medicine in UK medical schools is generally patchy and mainly focused on literature searches and critical appraisal skills.

The survey also highlighted that the curricula have little emphasis on skills to put evidence into practice. This points towards a gap in the education of medical undergraduates in particular and other health professionals in general around evidence-based medicine.

Although the package was developed specifically for final year medical students, it is also available to the wider audience of healthcare professionals and is proving to be useful for foundation year doctors, pharmacists and nurses.

8 March 2010

This page was last updated: 14 April 2010

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Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.