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NICE consults on new chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic kidney disease draft quality standards

NICE has today (30 September) launched a consultation on its draft quality standards for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)[1] and chronic kidney disease (CKD)[2] in adults. The consultation period will also include field testing during which NICE implementation consultants will visit service providers, GPs and Primary Care Trusts to explore how the standards can be effectively and successfully put into practice.

NICE quality standards reflect the very best in high quality patient care. They aim to help healthcare practitioners and commissioners of care deliver excellent services. They are the only standards in health and social care that apply nationally in England, and are derived from the best available evidence, usually NICE guidance or other sources that have been accredited by NHS Evidence[3].

NICE quality standards are aimed at:

  • Patients and the public
  • clinicians
  • public health practitioners
  • commissioners
  • service providers.

The draft quality standard on COPD identifies a number of elements of high quality patient care, including:

  • People receiving a clinical diagnosis of COPD have a record of one or more indicative symptoms.
  • People with COPD who smoke are encouraged to stop and offered help to do so.
  • People with COPD, meeting appropriate criteria, are offered an effective pulmonary rehabilitation programme.

The draft quality standard on CKD defines high quality patient care to include the following:

  • People with CKD are assessed for disease progression and associated complications.
  • People with CKD in defined at risk groups are referred for specialist assessment in accordance with NICE guidance.
  • People with CKD are immunised against infection in accordance with current policy.

The draft quality standards are available on the NICE website until 5.00pm, Wednesday 10 November 2010, and allow stakeholders to comment on the drafts and help prioritise which statements are most important to support quality improvement.

Dr Fergus Macbeth, Centre for Clinical PracticeDirector at NICE said: “The draft NICE quality standards on COPD and CKD have been developed from a range of evidence sources such as published NICE guidance, and the UK Renal Association Clinical Practice Guidelines. The standards will set the benchmark for healthcare quality in these two disease areas, to enable healthcare commissioners and providers to deliver the best care locally. I would encourage all those with an interest in these areas to submit their comments via the NICE website.”

These drafts have been issued for consultation;NICE has not yet published the final quality standards to the NHS.

The draft standards are available for consultation on the NICE website until 5.00pm on Wednesday 10 November at http://www.nice.org.uk/aboutnice/qualitystandards/indevelopment/qualitystandardsindevelopment.jsp

All eligible comments will be reviewed by the independent Topic Expert Group and the Programme Board and the standards will be refined in light of this information. The final quality standards for COPD and CKD are expected to be published in March 2011.

Ends

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Notes to Editors

  • The draft quality standards on COPD are derived from the following evidence sources:
    • NICE (2010) Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults in primary and secondary care (partial update). NICE clinical guideline 101.
    • Department of Health (2010) Consultation on a strategy for services for COPD in England.
  • The UK Renal Association Clinical Practice Guidelines can be found at: http://www.renal.org/Clinical/GuidelinesSection/Guidelines.aspx
  • The draft quality standards on CKD in adults are derived from the following evidence sources:
    • NICE (2008) Chronic kidney disease: early identification and management of chronic kidney disease in adults in primary and secondary care. NICE clinical guideline 73.
    • NICE (2006) Anaemia management in people with chronic kidney disease. NICE clinical guideline 39.
    • UK Renal Association (2010) Clinical practice guidelines: Vascular access for haemodialysis.
    • UK Renal Association (2010) Clinical practice guidelines: Peritoneal dialysis.
    • UK Renal Association (2009) Clinical practice guidelines: Planning, initiating and withdrawal of renal replacement therapy.
    • UK Renal Association (2009) Clinical practice guidelines: Peritoneal access.
    • UK Renal Association (2009) Clinical practice guidelines: Blood borne virus infection.
    • UK Renal Association (2009) Clinical practice guidelines: Haemodialysis.
    • UK Renal Association (2008) Clinical practice guidelines: Assessment for renal transplantation.
    • UK Renal Association (2008) Clinical practice guidelines: Acute kidney injury.
    • Department of Health (2010) Immunisation against infectious disease - ‘The Green Book'.
    • Department of Health (2009) Achieving excellence in kidney care: Delivering the National Service Framework for Renal Services.
    • Department of Health (2007) Second Progress Report on the Renal NSF.
    • Department of Health (2004) National Service Framework for Renal Services: Part One - Dialysis and transplantation.
    • Department of Health (2005) National Service Framework for Renal Services - Part Two: Chronic kidney disease, acute renal failure and end of life care.
    • Transparency in outcomes - a framework for the NHSconsultation can be found at http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Consultations/Liveconsultations/DH_117583

About NICE

  • The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent organisation responsible for providing national guidance on the promotion of good health and the prevention and treatment of ill health.

NICE produces guidance in three areas of health:

1. public health - guidance on the promotion of good health and the prevention of ill health for those working in the NHS, local authorities and the wider public and voluntary sector.

2. health technologies - guidance on the use of new and existing medicines, treatments, procedures and medical technologies within the NHS

3. clinical practice - guidance on the appropriate treatment and care of people with specific diseases and conditions within the NHS.

[1] Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the name for a collection of lung diseases including chronic bronchitis, emphysema and chronic obstructive airways disease.

[2] Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a chronic (long-term) condition where the kidneys progressively lose their function.

[3] The recently announced Transparency in Outcomes framework for the NHS proposes using quality standards to produce more detailed commissioning guidance to meet the suggested outcome goals.

This page was last updated: 21 October 2010

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Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.