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NICE Collaborating Centre for Social Care announced

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has awarded a contract to the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and its partner organisations, to support the development, adoption and dissemination of its social care guidance and quality standards from 1 April, as the NICE Collaborating Centre for Social Care.

Developing social care guidance and quality standards is a new responsibility for NICE, as outlined in the government's Health and Social Care Act (2012). From 1 April, NICE will expand its remit and to reflect this, it will be known as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE).

The NICE Collaborating Centre for Social Care will use NICE's methods and processes to develop social care guidance for NICE. NICE will then use these as a basis for its quality standards for social care. The Centre will support the adoption and dissemination of these quality standards.

The contract has been awarded to SCIE and its partner organisations following an open procurement process.

Professor Gillian Leng, Deputy Chief Executive and Director of Health and Social Care at NICE said: "We are very pleased to work with SCIE and its partner organisations in a formal capacity as our NICE Collaborating Centre for Social Care.

"With SCIE's track-record in promoting and facilitating quality improvement and information-sharing across the UK's care services, we are confident that they have the relevant expertise to support us in this new and important area of work."

SCIE works closely with a number of organisations and research units to carry out work relevant to the social care sector. SCIE's partner organisations for the NICE Collaborating Centre for Social Care are:

  • Evidence for Policy and Practice Information and Coordinating Centre (EPPI-Centre), which is part of the Social Science Research Unit at the Institute of Education, University of London
  • Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) at the London School of Economics and Political Science and the University of Kent
  • Research in Practice (RIP)
  • Research in Practice for Adults (RIPfA)

With SCIE, these will all contribute to the future development of NICE guidance on social care as the NICE Collaborating Centre for Social Care. NICE will commission the Centre to develop its social care guidance on up to six topics at a time. The scheduling of these topics is currently underway.

NICE will publish its first two quality standards for social care in April, as part of a pilot programme to test its methods and processes. These will cover priority areas for quality improvement for care services for people with dementia and for the health and wellbeing of looked-after children and young people. They will be based on existing NICE-accredited health and socal care guidance.

The Department of Health and the Department for Education have referred a further nine social care topics for the development of NICE quality standards. These include the transition between child and adult services, medicines management in care homes, and the mental wellbeing of older people in residential care.

Ends

Notes to Editors

1. NICE has awarded the contract to SCIE and its partner organisations for a period of three years from 1 April 2013, at a value of £1.8 million a year. The NICE Collaborating Centre for Social Care will work on six guidance topics at any one time, in addition to adoption and dissemination support.

2. NICE Collaborating Centres allow NICE to harness a broad range of expertise in the development of its guidance. NICE already contracts four Collaborating Centres for the production of its clinical guidelines. They are partnerships between Royal Colleges, academic institutions, NHS trusts and other organisations.

3. The Health and Social Care Act (2012) sets out a new responsibility for NICE to develop quality standards and other guidance for social care from 1 April 2013. To reflect this new role, NICE's name will change from 1 April to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and it will be a Non-Departmental Public Body. Further information on NICE´s new role in social care.

4. For further information about the new quality standards that NICE will publish in April, please visit:

5. In addition to the two quality standards that will publish in April, last September, the Department of Health and the Department for Education formally asked NICE to begin developing quality standards for health and social care professionals in the following areas:

  • Autism in adults
  • Autism in children
  • Child maltreatment
  • Domiciliary care
  • The transition between child and adult services
  • The transition between health and social care, including discharge planning, admission avoidance, reducing readmissions and reducing unnecessary bed occupancy
  • Mental wellbeing of older people in residential care
  • Management of physical and mental co-morbidities of older people in community and residential care settings
  • Medicines management in care homes

Further information on social care quality standards.

6. Quality standards aim to drive forward high quality care by identifying and addressing areas in need of improvement. They are based on accredited guidance, including NICE's clinical guidelines and public health guidance. Where no health or social care guidance exists on a topic, NICE will first produce new guidance recommendations and then develop the associated quality standards based on these.

7. For further information about the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) and its partner organisations, please visit the SCIE website.

About NICE

1. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent organisation responsible for providing national guidance and standards on the promotion of good health and the prevention and treatment of ill health.

2. NICE produces guidance in three areas of health:

  • public health - guidance on the promotion of good health and the prevention of ill health for those working in the NHS, local authorities and the wider public and voluntary sector
  • health technologies - guidance on the use of new and existing medicines, treatments, medical technologies (including devices and diagnostics) and procedures within the NHS
  • clinical practice - guidance on the appropriate treatment and care of people with specific diseases and conditions within the NHS

3. NICE produces standards for patient care:

  • quality standards - these reflect the very best in high quality patient care, to help healthcare practitioners and commissioners of care deliver excellent services
  • Quality and Outcomes Framework - NICE develops the clinical and health improvement indicators in the QOF, the Department of Health scheme which rewards GPs for how well they care for patients

4. The Health and Social Care Act (2012) sets out a new responsibility for NICE to develop quality standards and other guidance for social care from 1 April 2013. To reflect this new role, NICE's name will change from 1 April to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and it will be a Non-Departmental Public Body.

5. NICE provides advice and support on putting NICE guidance and standards into practice through its implementation programme, and it collates and accredits high quality health guidance, research and information to help health professionals deliver the best patient care through NHS Evidence.

This page was last updated: 07 January 2013

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Selected, reliable information for health and social care in one place

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.