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NICE helps local authorities to reduce number of child injuries and deaths

New tools to help councillors and local authority officers keep children and young people safe from harm are available online today (23 February) from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) website. These new resources have been especially designed to help local authorities implement new NICE guidance on preventing serious injuries and deaths to children under the age of 15.

Unintentional injuries[1] are a leading cause of death and serious injury in children and young people under 15. Each serious injury and death is a tragedy, yet many are preventable. In November 2010, NICE published three pieces of complementary public health guidance on this topic recommending ways to reduce unintentional injuries based on the best available evidence.[2]

To help put these new recommendations into practice, NICE has developed two new tools in partnership with the Local Government Improvement and Development Agency and the Centre for Public Scrutiny. Both are designed to help the users save time and be used locally.

Key facts for local councillors: making the case for investment has been produced by the Local Government Improvement and Development Agency (IDeA) and NICE. It is designed for use by local councillors with the help of their public health analyst, scrutiny officer or a member of the local Children's Safeguarding Board. It can help councillors to inspire, challenge and lead the case for local investment at a strategic level on the grounds of using the best evidence available; value for money and cost effectiveness; their personal or political commitment; or a combination of all of these.

Ten questions to ask if you are scrutinising local action on preventing unintentional injuries in under 15s has been produced by the Centre for Public Scrutiny in partnership with NICE. It provides a question and answer framework especially for members of overview and scrutiny committees (OSCs) and their officers based on the NICE guidance. It also provides information on how OSCs should prepare for scrutiny, and who to invite as witnesses.

Tim Gilling, Deputy Executive Director at the Centre for Public Scrutiny, said: "Considering NICE guidance is a key way for councillors to check that evidence of best practice is being applied locally. This latest guide will help overview and scrutiny committees to understand and tackle the issues that lie behind levels of accidental injury in their areas."

NICE has developed a range of other practical tools to help implement this new set of guidance including a slide set presentation, self-assessment spreadsheet, and costing tool which includes an Excel template to help build the case for investment. For further information and to download these resources, please visit www.nice.org.uk/usingguidance/implementationtools/thematicguidancesupport/PreventingUnintentionalInjuries.jsp

To find out more about NICE's guidance on preventing unintentional injuries among under 15s and the accompanying support tools; anyone working to improve public health can take part in a hot seat discussion live online, on Tuesday 1 March 2011, 11am - 1pm.

The hot seat, hosted by IDeA's Healthy Communities Community of Practice (CoP), will give you a chance to pose questions to Simon Ellis, Associate Director for this set of guidance, and Dr Heather Ward, Chair of the Programme Development Group that developed the strategies guidance.

Register for free to become a member of the Healthy Communities CoP and to take part in the online discussion.

Ends

Notes to Editors

About the guidance

1. On Wednesday 24 November 2010 NICE issued final guidance on strategies to prevent unintentional injuries among children and young people aged under 15. It should be read in conjunction with two pieces of related intervention guidance published at the same time. These focus on the provision of home safety equipment and home risk assessments; and road design and modification. To read the guidance in full, please visit http://guidance.nice.org.uk/PH29 (strategies), http://guidance.nice.org.uk/PH30 (home) and http://guidance.nice.org.uk/PH131 (road).

2. The strategies guidance is for commissioners and providers of health services, local authority children's services, local authorities and their strategic partnerships, local highway authorities, local safeguarding children boards, police, fire and rescue services, policy makers, professional bodies, providers of play and leisure facilities, and schools. It is also for other public, private, voluntary and community organisations and services which have a direct or indirect role in preventing unintentional injuries among under-15s.

3. The guidance on home safety assessments and providing home safety equipment is for commissioners and providers of health services, environmental health services, housing services and associations, local authority children's services, local authority health and wellbeing boards, local authorities and their strategic partnerships, local safeguarding children boards, police, fire and rescue services, Sure Start and children's centres. It is also for practitioners who visit families and carers with children and young people aged under 15 (including GPs, midwives, social workers and health visitors).

4. The guidance on road design is for local highway authorities, local strategic partnerships, directors of public health, health professionals who have a responsibility for preventing or treating unintentional injuries affecting children and young people aged under 15, and school travel planners. It may also be of interest to road users, children, young people, their patents and carers and other members of the public.

5. Although NICE public health guidance is not statutory, the NHS, local authorities and the wider public, private, voluntary and community sectors are expected to follow it. NICE public health guidance applies in England only.

About NICE

1. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent organisation responsible for providing national guidance and standards on the promotion of good health and the prevention and treatment of ill health.

2. NICE produces guidance in three areas of health:

  • public health - guidance on the promotion of good health and the prevention of ill health for those working in the NHS, local authorities and the wider public and voluntary sector
  • health technologies - guidance on the use of new and existing medicines, treatments, medical technologies (including devices and diagnostics) and procedures within the NHS
  • clinical practice - guidance on the appropriate treatment and care of people with specific diseases and conditions within the NHS.

3. NICE produces standards for patient care:

  • quality standards -these reflect the very best in high quality patient care, to help healthcare practitioners and commissioners of care deliver excellent services
  • Quality and Outcomes Framework - NICE develops the clinical and health improvement indicators in the QOF, the Department of Health scheme which rewards GPs for how well they care for patients.

4. NICE provides advice and support on putting NICE guidance and standards into practice through its implementation programme, and it collates and accredits high quality health guidance, research and information to help health professionals deliver the best patient care through NHS Evidence.



[1] This NICE public health guidance uses the term ‘unintentional injury' rather than accidents as ‘most injuries and their precipitating events are predictable and preventable.' (Davis R, Pless B 2001) The term ‘accident' implies an unpredictable and therefore unavoidable event.

[2] These consider strategies to prevent unintentional injuries; Home safety assessments and the provision of safety equipment; and Road design and modification.

This page was last updated: 22 February 2011

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Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.