Navigation

World Diabetes Day and NICE quality standards

World Diabetes Day takes place this year on Sunday 14 November. Coinciding with this important awareness-raising day, the NICE draft quality standard on diabetes is currently out for consultation until Thursday 16 December.

Diabetes affects around 2.8 million people in the UK, and it is estimated that there are over 500,000 people who have the condition but don't yet know it.[1]

NICE quality standards are developed from the best available evidence, usually NICE guidance or other NHS Evidence accredited sources. They reflect excellence in high quality patient care, and they aim to help healthcare practitioners and commissioners of care deliver the very best in services. Produced in collaboration with the NHS and social care professionals, as well as their partners and service users, they are aimed at patients and the public, clinicians, public health practitioners, commissioners and service providers. They are the only standards in health and social care that apply nationally in England.

The draft quality standard addresses the care of adults with diabetes and consists of 15 statements, each with associated quality measures outlining what best practice would look like, including:

  • People with diabetes receive tailored nutritional advice from an appropriately trained healthcare professional or as part of a structured education programme and physical activity advice on an ongoing basis.
  • People with diabetes discuss and agree a personalised documented HbA1c target level (a measure of the level of glucose in the blood), usually between 6.5% and 7.5% (48 and 58 mmol/mol) with their healthcare professional, and receive support to minimise hypoglycaemia, including review of glucose levels and strategies while achieving and maintaining this level of HbA1cthrough structured education and medication.
  • People with diabetes receive an assessment for the presence and risk of retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiovascular disease including peripheral arterial disease, and sexual dysfunction, and are managed appropriately.
  • People with diabetes at increased or high risk of foot ulceration or who have a foot ulcer are regularly reviewed by a foot protection team in accordance with NICE guidance.

The draft quality standard is available on the NICE website until 5.00pm, Thursday 16 December and allows stakeholders to comment and help prioritise which statements are most important to support quality improvement. All eligible comments will be reviewed by the independent Topic Expert Group, and the standard refined in light of this information.

Dr Fergus Macbeth, Centre for Clinical Practice Director at NICE, said:

"Diabetes is a serious, progressive condition that requires an integrated approach to delivery of services. This standard will set the precedent for high quality in diabetes care, helping to deliver the best for those with the condition."

This draft has been issued for consultation; NICE has not yet published the final quality standard to the NHS. The final quality standard on diabetes is due to be published in June 2011.

In addition, new NICE guidance published in October recommends a treatment called liraglutide (Victoza, Novo Nordisk) for some people affected by type 2 diabetes. A dose of 1.2 mg daily works by stimulating the release of insulin and, also reduces the appetite.

NICE also recommends insulin pump therapy for some adults with type 1 diabetes. Insulin pumps are small devices worn outside the body, which continuously deliver insulin into the body through a very thin tube or needle inserted under the skin.

Ends

Download PDF version

Notes to Editors

1. The draft quality standard on diabetes can be found at www.nice.org.uk/aboutnice/qualitystandards/indevelopment/diabetes.jsp

2. The draft quality standard on diabetes is derived from the following evidence sources:

  • Type 2 diabetes - newer agents (partial update of CG66). NICE clinical guideline 87 (2009; NHS Evidence accredited source). Available from www.nice.org.uk/CG87
  • Type 2 diabetes: the management of type 2 diabetes (partially updated by NICE clinical guideline 87). NICE clinical guideline 66 (2008; NHS Evidence accredited source). Available from www.nice.org.uk/CG66
  • Type 1 diabetes: diagnosis and management of type 1 diabetes in children, young people and adults. NICE clinical guideline 15 (2004; NHS Evidence accredited source). Available from www.nice.org.uk/CG15
  • Type 2 diabetes: prevention and management of foot problems. NICE Clinical Guideline 10 (2004; NHS Evidence accredited source). Available from www.nice.org.uk/CG10
  • Joint Department of Health and Diabetes UK Care Planning Working Group (2006) Care Planning in Diabetes. Available from www.dh.gov.uk

3. The guidance on liraglutide for type 2 diabetes can be found at http://guidance.nice.org.uk/TA203

4. The guidance on insulin pump therapy for type 1 diabetes can be found at http://www.nice.org.uk/TA151

5. World Diabetes Day takes place each year on 14 November. It was jointly introduced by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), an umbrella organisation of over 200 national diabetes associations in over 160 countries. Further information can be found at http://www.worlddiabetesday.org/

About NICE

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent organisation responsible for providing national guidance and standards on the promotion of good health and the prevention and treatment of ill health. NICE produces guidance in three areas of health:

  • public health
  • health technologies, and
  • clinical practice

NICE also produces standards for patient care through its work on the Quality and Outcomes Framework and quality standards. With high quality health information collated through NHS Evidence, all of NICE's work is supported by its implementation programme.



[1] Diabetes UK

This page was last updated: 12 November 2010

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Selected, reliable information for health and social care in one place

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.

Accessibility | Cymraeg | Freedom of information | Vision Impaired | Contact Us | Glossary | Data protection | Copyright | Disclaimer | Terms and conditions

Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.