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1415 results for NICE quality standards or clinical guidelines

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  1. COVID-19 rapid guideline: managing symptoms (including at the end of life) in the community (NG163)

    The purpose of this guideline is to provide recommendations for managing COVID-19 symptoms for patients in the community, including at the end of life. It also includes recommendations about managing medicines for these patients, and protecting staff from infection.

  2. COVID-19 rapid guideline: haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (NG164)

    The purpose of this guideline is to maximise the safety of patients who need haemopoietic stem cell transplantation and make the best use of NHS resources, while protecting staff from infection.

  3. COVID 19 rapid guideline: renal transplantation (NG178)

    This guideline covers children, young people and adults who need or who have had a kidney transplant, and people who are donating a kidney (live donors). It also advises transplant and referring centres on how to run their services, while keeping them safe for patients, donors and staff during the COVID-19 pandemic. Kidney transplants improve life expectancy and quality of life, and cost less than dialysis in the long term, so providing effective and safe services will benefit patients and make the best use of resources.

  4. NICE guidelines

    NICE guidelines are evidence-based recommendations for health and care in England.

  5. Obesity: clinical assessment and management (QS127)

    This quality standard covers assessing and managing obesity in adults, young people and children, including referral for specialist care and bariatric (weight loss) surgery. It includes people who are obese and have, or are at risk of, other medical conditions. It describes high-quality care in priority areas for improvement.

  6. Multimorbidity: clinical assessment and management (NG56)

    This guideline covers optimising care for adults with multimorbidity (multiple long-term conditions) by reducing treatment burden (polypharmacy and multiple appointments) and unplanned care. It aims to improve quality of life by promoting shared decisions based on what is important to each person in terms of treatments, health priorities, lifestyle and goals. The guideline sets out which people are most likely to benefit from an approach to care that takes account of multimorbidity, how they can be identified and what the care involves.