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21 results for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

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  1. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in over 16s: management (CG141)

    This guideline covers how upper gastrointestinal bleeding can be effectively managed in adults and young people aged 16 years and older. It aims to identify which diagnostic and therapeutic steps are useful so hospitals can develop a structure in which clinical teams can deliver an optimum service for people who develop this condition.

  2. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in adults (QS38)

    This quality standard covers the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in adults and young people (aged 16 and over). It describes high-quality care in priority areas for improvement.

  3. Blood transfusion (NG24)

    This guideline covers the assessment for and management of blood transfusions in adults, young people and children over 1 year old. It covers the general principles of blood transfusion, but does not make recommendations relating to specific conditions.

  4. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and dyspepsia in adults: investigation and management (CG184)

    This guideline covers investigating and managing gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and dyspepsia in people aged 18 and over. It aims to improve the treatment of GORD and dyspepsia by making detailed recommendations on Helicobacter pylori eradication, and specifying when to consider laparoscopic fundoplication and referral to specialist services.

  5. Suspected cancer: recognition and referral (NG12)

    This guideline covers identifying children, young people and adults with symptoms that could be caused by cancer. It outlines appropriate investigations in primary care, and selection of people to refer for a specialist opinion. It aims to help people understand what to expect if they have symptoms that may suggest cancer.

  6. Venous thromboembolism in over 16s: reducing the risk of hospital-acquired deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism (NG89)

    This guideline covers assessing and reducing the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE or blood clots, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) in people aged 16 and over in hospital. It aims to help healthcare professionals identify people most at risk and describes interventions that can be used to reduce the risk of VTE.

  7. Alcohol-use disorders: diagnosis and management of physical complications (CG100)

    This guideline covers care for adults and young people (aged 10 years and older) with physical health problems that are completely or partly caused by an alcohol-use disorder. It aims to improve the health of people with alcohol-use disorders by providing recommendations on managing acute alcohol withdrawal and treating alcohol-related conditions.

  8. Intrapartum care for healthy women and babies (CG190)

    This guideline covers the care of healthy women and their babies, during labour and immediately after the birth. It focuses on women who give birth between 37 and 42 weeks of pregnancy (‘term’). The guideline helps women to make an informed choice about where to have their baby. It also aims to reduce variation in areas of care such as fetal monitoring during labour and management of the third stage of labour.

  9. Eltrombopag for treating chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura (TA293)

    Evidence-based recommendations on eltrombopag (Revolade) for treating chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura (chronic ITP)

  10. Medicines associated with dependence or withdrawal symptoms: safe prescribing and withdrawal management for adults (NG215)

    This guideline covers general principles for prescribing and managing withdrawal from opioids, benzodiazepines, gabapentinoids, Z-drugs and antidepressants in primary and secondary care.

  11. Generalised anxiety disorder and panic disorder in adults: management (CG113)

    This guideline covers the care and treatment of people aged 18 and over with generalised anxiety disorder (chronic anxiety) or panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia or panic attacks). It aims to help people achieve complete relief of symptoms (remission), which is associated with better functioning and a lower likelihood of relapse.